Vision, Values, and Victory: A CEO’s Blueprint for Organizational Clarity

One of the most critical roles of a CEO is to create and maintain organizational clarity. This clarity encompasses everything from the company’s vision and values to understanding competitors and defining clear expectations for each team member. Let’s explore how CEOs can effectively cultivate this clarity.

Defining the Organization’s Vision and Values

(1) Craft a Compelling Vision: Your vision should be inspiring and provide a clear direction for where the company is headed.

(2) Establish Core Values: These values should reflect the essence of your company’s ethos and guide every decision and action.

Understanding and Communicating the Business Landscape

(1) Know Your Business: Clearly articulate what your business does, its products or services, and its value proposition.

(2) Identify Your Competitors: Understand who your competitors are and how they impact your business strategy.

(3) Highlight Your Uniqueness: Clearly communicate what sets your company apart from the competition.

Setting Clear Expectations and Priorities

(1) Define Roles and Responsibilities: Ensure every team member understands their role and how it contributes to the larger vision.

(2) Communicate Your Priorities: Set and share organizational priorities so everyone is aligned and working towards common goals.

Leading By Example

Indra Nooyi, Former CEO of PepsiCo: Indra Nooyi is renowned for her role in redefining PepsiCo’s vision and strategy. She led a significant shift towards healthier products, aligning with emerging consumer health trends. Nooyi’s vision, ‘Performance with Purpose,’ aimed to deliver sustainable long-term growth focusing on more nutritious products, a smaller environmental footprint, and empowered people. Her ability to communicate this vision and drive organizational change was vital to PepsiCo’s success during her tenure.

Conclusions on Organizational Clarity

Organizational clarity is not a one-time effort but a continuous process. As a CEO, it’s your responsibility to revisit and reinforce these elements regularly.

Consider scheduling a coaching session to explore further how you can develop and maintain organizational clarity within your company.

 

About the Author: Howard M. Shore is an accomplished CEO coach and the founder of Activate Group Inc. He specializes in assisting leaders to maximize their potential and build high-performing teams, drawing upon a wealth of experience and proven methodologies.

 

Leadership by Design: A CEO’s Strategy for Building a Winning Team

As a CEO, one of your most critical responsibilities is assembling and nurturing a leadership team to drive your company toward its strategic goals. This article provides insights and actionable strategies for selecting the right individuals and fostering an outstanding leadership team.

Understanding the CEO’s Role in Team Building

The CEO is not just a decision-maker but also a visionary who sets the tone for the team’s dynamic and performance. Your role involves identifying potential leaders, aligning them with your vision, and creating an environment where they can thrive.

Strategies for Selecting the Right Team Members

(1) Look Beyond the Resume: While experience and qualifications are important, also consider candidates’ alignment with the company’s values and culture.

(2) Diversity: Often, leaders like to hire people who are more like themselves. A diverse team brings varied perspectives and fosters innovation.

(3) Emphasize Emotional Intelligence: Leaders with high emotional intelligence can navigate complex interpersonal dynamics and foster a positive team environment.

Building an Excellent Leadership Team

(1) Foster Open Communication: Encourage transparency and open dialogue within your team. This builds trust and ensures everyone is aligned with the company’s goals.

(2) Develop a Shared Vision: Involve your leadership team in shaping and owning the company’s vision. This creates a sense of shared purpose and direction.

(3) Invest in Professional Development: Regular training and development opportunities help your team grow and stay engaged with the company’s evolving needs.

Consider how Satya Nadella transformed Microsoft’s leadership team, focusing on collaboration and innovation, which was key in revitalizing the company’s culture and business.

Conclusions for Leadership by Design

Selecting and building an exceptional leadership team is a critical and ongoing process. It requires a strategic approach, a keen understanding of people, and a commitment to nurturing talent.

For personalized advice on building your leadership team, consider scheduling a coaching session to explore strategies tailored to your company’s unique needs.

 

About the Author: Howard M. Shore is an accomplished CEO coach and the founder of Activate Group Inc. He specializes in assisting leaders to maximize their potential and build high-performing teams, drawing upon a wealth of experience and proven methodologies.

Measuring a CEO’s Success: Beyond the Income Statement

Traditionally, a CEO’s success is evaluated based on hard financial metrics reflected in the income statement – revenue growth, profitability, shareholder returns, etc. However, this narrow focus can overlook critical aspects of leadership that significantly impact an organization’s long-term health and sustainability. This article delves into the often-overlooked areas of CEO performance evaluation: Culture, Human Capital Management, Team Cohesion, and the effectiveness of Strategy and Execution.

Evaluating Culture and Human Capital Management

The culture of an organization is a direct reflection of its leadership. A successful CEO nurturing a positive culture fosters an environment of innovation, collaboration, and employee satisfaction. But how do we measure this?

Employee Engagement Surveys: Regular surveys can provide insights into employee morale, belief in the company’s vision, and their perception of leadership effectiveness. We use Gallup’s survey around their renown 12 questions.

Turnover Rates: High turnover can indicate issues with the organizational culture. A successful CEO typically sees lower turnover rates, especially among high performers.

External Employer Ratings: Platforms like Glassdoor provide unfiltered employee feedback, which can be a valuable measure of a CEO’s effectiveness in culture-building.

Assessing Team Cohesion

The ability of a CEO to build cohesive leadership teams is crucial. Cohesive teams are more likely to implement effective strategies and achieve organizational goals.

360-Degree Feedback: Feedback from various organizational levels can highlight how well a CEO fosters collaboration and teamwork.

Team Performance Metrics: Evaluate the performance of key teams within the organization. Successful teams often reflect effective leadership at the top.

Five Dysfunctions of a Team Survey: We administer an assessment developed around Patrick Lencioni’s best-selling book. It helps teams self-assess their effectiveness in the areas of trust, conflict, commitment, accountability, and results.

Measuring Strategy and Execution

A CEO’s prowess in strategy formulation and execution is pivotal to organizational success. This is measured by:

Alignment of Strategy with Outcomes: Assess how well the CEO’s strategic decisions align with the outcomes. This includes looking at long-term growth, market expansion, and product development successes.

Innovation Index: Evaluate the company’s investment in innovation and its returns. This could include new product launches, patents filed, and market disruptions.

Adaptability and Crisis Management: How a CEO navigates challenges and unexpected market changes is a critical measure of their strategic acumen.

Measuring CEO Success Conclusion

While the income statement provides a snapshot of financial health, it doesn’t fully capture a CEO’s effectiveness. By incorporating measures of culture, team cohesion, human capital management, and the success of strategy execution, we gain a more holistic view of a CEO’s performance. These soft skills are as crucial as financial metrics in ensuring the long-term success and sustainability of an organization.

For organizations and boards, it’s essential to broaden the criteria for CEO performance evaluation. This comprehensive approach not only enhances the accuracy of performance assessments but also encourages CEOs to focus on these vital areas of leadership.

 

About the Author: Howard M. Shore is the founder and CEO of Activate Group Inc., a growth-focused coaching firm for business leaders. With decades of experience, as a CEO Coach and the author of The Leader Launchpad and Your Business is a Leaky Bucket, Howard is dedicated to empowering leaders to unlock their potential and propel their organizations to new heights.

The Paradox of CEO Leadership: Decoding CEO Success

In the ever-evolving landscape of corporate leadership, the role of a Chief Executive Officer (CEO) remains pivotal and perplexing. Through my journey as a CEO Coach, I have encountered a spectrum of leaders who, despite their diverse approaches, have steered their companies with varying degrees of success. This article delves into the intricate maze of CEO leadership, debunking the one-size-fits-all myth and offering actionable insights for C-suite leaders.

The CEO’s Diverse Faces

The role of a CEO is not monolithic. I have witnessed CEOs who create a thriving company culture and others who lead successful organizations despite creating a toxic work environment. Consider the case of Company X, where the CEO’s narcissistic tendencies and singular focus on profit yielded significant financial success, albeit with a high employee turnover rate. Contrast this with Company Y, led by a visionary CEO, whose lack of operational finesse was balanced by a strong executive team, leading to sustained growth.

The Misconception of a One-Size-Fits-All CEO

Success as a CEO does not always follow a conventional script. Some leaders check all the traditional boxes of effective leadership – charismatic, empathetic, strategic – yet their companies struggle. This was evident in the case of Company Z, where the CEO’s exemplary leadership traits failed to translate into market success due to external factors like market volatility and competitive dynamics.

Team Dynamics and Leadership

A CEO’s approach towards team building and management can significantly influence a company’s trajectory. Some CEOs are disciplined in crafting exceptional teams and promptly addressing non-performance. Others adopt a more laissez-faire approach, leading to varied outcomes. The success story of Company A, where deliberate team optimization led to breakthrough performance, stands as a testament to the power of effective team management.

Actionable Takeaways

(1) Embrace Flexibility: Adapt your leadership style to your company’s unique context and challenges.

(2) Build Strong Teams: Invest in building a diverse and capable executive team.

(3) Focus on Sustainability: Ensure that success is not just a flash in the pan but sustainable over the long term.

As we navigate the complex realm of corporate leadership, it is essential to learn and adapt continuously. I invite you to reach out for a personalized coaching session to explore how you can enhance your leadership journey.

 

About the Author: Howard M. Shore is the founder and CEO of Activate Group Inc., a growth-focused coaching firm for business leaders. With decades of experience, as a CEO Coach and the author of The Leader Launchpad and Your Business is a Leaky Bucket, Howard is dedicated to empowering leaders to unlock their potential and propel their organizations to new heights.

Unlocking Team Success: The Imperative of a Leader’s Commitment to Meetings

In my years working with leaders, a recurring theme has emerged: meetings are seen as both a blessing and a curse. When done well, meetings can drive results. When done poorly, they can bring entire organizations to a halt. The key differentiator between these two outcomes? The leader’s approach.

The Heart of Leadership: Commitment to Their People

The number one job of a leader is to make time and be present for their people. Even though it is evident, leadership must be committed to participating and engaging in the established meeting rhythms for organization and team effectiveness. Commitment differs from a decision. We can decide to have meetings but not be committed. Commitment is the higher standard of dedication to meetings because it will improve communication, teamwork, and decision-making.

Meetings are not about you; they are about the organization and the team. Frequently missed meetings send a message that you care most about yourself and are not committed to being a vital team member.

The Power of Precedent – The Secret Sauce of Effective Teams

Let me share a story: Rachel, a senior executive, prided herself on her team’s agility. However, she frequently shifted meeting times, causing havoc in her team’s schedules. Over time, this inconsistency led to missed targets and a frustrated team.

Consistency of active participation from individual team members is critical. When consistency drops, so does priority focus, agility, and timeliness of decisions. Missing meetings unconsciously causes silos and reduces the effectiveness of the organization.

Top leadership has a higher burden to set the right example. Their actions set precedents and can often be the deciding influence between adoption, engagement, and success; or resistance, withdrawal, and disappointing results – the rest of the team takes their direction from them. Leadership must always be mindful to avoid the Do as I Say, Not as I DO trap.

When leaders aren’t consistent in their approach to meetings, focus wanes, agility diminishes, and the timeliness of decisions suffers. As silos build, the organization loses momentum.

Reframing the Meeting Narrative

Yes, there might be too many meetings. But the real issue? Too many bad meetings. Instead of eliminating meetings, focus on improving them. Engage the right stakeholders. Set clear agendas. And ensure each meeting serves its purpose.

Actionable Steps for Leaders:

(1) Evaluate Your Commitment: Reflect on your meeting attendance and engagement. Are you truly committed?

(2) Prioritize Consistency: Stick to scheduled meetings. Reschedule only when absolutely necessary.

(3) Set the Tone: Remember, your team is watching. Model the behavior you want to see.

(4) Seek Feedback: Regularly ask for input on meeting effectiveness and be open to making changes.

Conclusion: Your Call to Action to Unlock Team Success

Your team’s success rests heavily on your shoulders. But remember, you don’t carry that burden alone. Your team can and will thrive with a committed and consistent approach to meetings. It’s time to recommit, be present, and unlock your team’s true potential.

Activate your leadership potential and make every meeting count. The success of your organization depends on it.

 

About the Author:  Howard M. Shore, CEO of Activate Group, Inc., is an acclaimed leadership coach and author of “The Leader Launchpad.” With decades of experience in guiding leaders and organizations to success, Howard specializes in unlocking the full potential of businesses by driving actionable strategies and fostering effective leadership practices.

Inspiring Beyond the Transaction: Elevating a Value-Centric Workforce in Today’s Business Landscape

In an age where mere service delivery is no longer the golden standard, businesses across the board find themselves navigating a transformative shift. The challenge? Transitioning from transaction-driven operations to a holistic, value-centric ethos. So, how can modern organizations embed this paradigm shift into their DNA? Let’s explore.

Company Culture: The Double-Edged Sword

Every organization has its unique culture, the invisible thread weaving its ethos. While it’s the bedrock of all great companies, a misaligned culture can inadvertently become a straitjacket, stifling innovation and creativity.

Case Example: A client in the financial sector shared a tale of procedural rigidity preventing a groundbreaking solution that could have streamlined a complex customer journey. Instead of breaking boundaries, the firm’s culture erected them.

Actionable Step: Initiate periodic culture assessments. Pinpoint outdated or restrictive practices. Engage teams in suggesting areas ripe for rejuvenation.

Leadership: Pioneers or Gatekeepers?

Leaders wear multiple hats, from guides to decision-makers. But those who limit autonomy or appear unreceptive to diverse solutions might be unintentionally sidelining innovative strategies.

Case Example: In a prominent marketing agency, a newbie strategist proposed an out-of-the-box campaign. Instead of applause, she encountered resistance because she deviated from the “norm.” Such attitudes hinder more than they help.

Actionable Step: Leaders champion open-mindedness. Implement open-door policies and encourage individuals from all ranks to pitch their insights. Leadership isn’t about micromanaging but nurturing and igniting sparks.

Cultivating the Right Employee Mindset

To evolve from transactional thinking to value creation, employees should:

  • View each interaction as a steppingstone for stronger relationships.
  • Constantly scout avenues for refining processes and offerings.
  • Identify revenue potentials, even in seemingly mundane tasks.

Actionable Step: Host regular workshops emphasizing relationship building, critical thinking, and proactive problem-solving. Celebrate value-driven successes to foster a culture of recognition.

Revamping Role Descriptions

Critical thinking must feature prominently across all job roles to truly democratize innovation, not just the higher echelons.

Actionable Step: Reevaluate job descriptions to incorporate proactive problem-solving, critical thinking, and a commitment to continuous learning.

Compensation Strategies: More Than Just Money

While monetary rewards are effective motivators, it’s essential to understand that employees today value more than just their paychecks. Recognition, growth opportunities, and autonomy often outshine financial incentives.

Case Example: One of my clients introduced an “Employee of the Month” title. While the financial reward was symbolic, the esteem and recognition it conferred led to a marked uptick in proactive initiatives.

Actionable Step: Diversify your reward mechanisms. Engage with teams to understand what truly drives and inspires them.

To conclude, the business landscape, be it service or consumer-driven, is dynamically evolving. It beckons organizations to move beyond mere transactions and sow seeds of genuine value.

 

Call to Action: Are you geared up for this transformation? Let’s chart this journey together. Connect with Activate Group, Inc. for a strategy tailored to your organization’s aspirations.

 

About the Author: Howard M. Shore is the CEO of Activate Group, Inc., and the voice behind “The Leader Launchpad.” A beacon in the realm of organizational excellence, Howard’s mission is to provide guidance and help sculpt companies that deliver and inspire.

Breaking Free from the Recruitment Quagmire: A Guide for Overwhelmed Leaders

There’s no doubt that we are currently in the throes of an incredibly demanding job market. As CEO of Activate Group Inc, I’ve had a ringside view of how this has impacted businesses across various sectors. I’ve noticed a concerning pattern: leaders straining under the immense pressure of filling vacancies while handling their managerial responsibilities.

Consider the case of one of our clients, a high-growth tech startup we’ll call XYZ Corp. After one of their key team members left, the responsibility of filling the position fell squarely on the departed individual’s manager. Now, this manager was already short-staffed and had to take up the responsibilities of the vacant position. The added task of reviewing hundreds of resumes, conducting initial screenings, and formal interviews simply exacerbated the strain.

The example above occurs often. Many leaders find themselves stuck in a similar rut, battling to maintain operations with a depleted team while having to recruit new talent. It’s an unsustainable situation that calls for a change in strategy. Here’s how you can escape this quagmire:

(1) Delegate: Distribute some of your non-essential tasks to trusted team members to free up your time for recruitment. This doesn’t mean shifting your responsibilities onto an already overworked team, but rather, empowering them to take on new roles.

(2) Leverage Technology: Invest in applicant tracking systems (ATS) or recruitment software to streamline your hiring process. These tools can automate the initial screening process, filter out unfit candidates, and help you focus on potential hires.

(3) Training: Provide the necessary resources and training to your internal team to screen candidates effectively. Equip them with the skills to identify key traits and qualifications that align with your company’s values and needs.

(4) Engage Recruitment Professionals: If you find the recruitment process too overwhelming, consider getting assistance from external recruitment professionals. They can provide a shortlist of potential candidates, saving you valuable time and resources.

(5) Revisit your Hiring Process: Are your job descriptions clear and accurate? Are you utilizing the right platforms to attract the talent you need? Take a moment to audit your hiring process and identify any areas that need improvement.

We all know that filling a vacant position can be a time-consuming and arduous process, but it doesn’t have to be. By utilizing these strategies, you can reclaim time, focus on your managerial tasks, and still recruit top-notch candidates.

If you need further assistance, I invite you to reach out to our team at Activate Group Inc. Our goal is to provide businesses with the tools and strategies to navigate their growth and operational challenges successfully. Let’s overcome this hurdle together.

 

About the Author: Howard M. Shore is the CEO of Activate Group Inc and author of “The Leader Launchpad.” His proven methodologies have guided countless businesses to break free from the barriers stunting their growth. Howard is passionate about helping businesses navigate their unique challenges and achieve their maximum potential. Through Activate Group Inc, Howard continues to empower C-suite leaders to overcome their business hurdles, no matter how complex.

Navigating Leadership Ego: Decision-Making with Humility and Clarity

Today we delve into a critical aspect of leadership – navigating the pitfalls of ego in decision-making. As C-Suite leaders, our egos can sometimes cloud our judgment, leading to biased and shortsighted choices. In this article, we’ll explore the significance of leading beyond ego, embracing self-awareness, and making decisions with humility for the organization’s greater good.

Understanding Leadership Ego: The Hidden Obstacle

Leadership ego refers to our sense of self-importance and attachment to personal beliefs. While confidence is crucial for leadership, an unchecked ego can close our eyes to alternative viewpoints and hinder collaboration.

Embracing Self-Awareness: Recognizing Personal Biases

Developing self-awareness is essential for mitigating the influence of ego on decision-making. Reflect on your biases and triggers, acknowledging that your perspectives may not always align with reality. A humble leader is willing to challenge their own assumptions and learn from others.

Seeking Diverse Perspectives: Expanding Your Vision

When faced with significant decisions, actively seek input from various stakeholders. Encourage diverse perspectives to challenge and complement your own ideas. Remember, a collective decision with a broader vision leads to more thoughtful and robust outcomes.

Balancing Confidence and Humility: Striking the Right Mix

Leadership requires a delicate balance between confidence and humility. Embrace your strengths while acknowledging your limitations. Displaying humility doesn’t diminish your leadership; it humanizes your approach and fosters trust among your team.

Putting the Organization First: Making Sacrifices for Success

A true leader prioritizes the organization’s success over personal glory. Sometimes, that means making decisions that might not be popular but are essential for the organization’s long-term well-being. Leading beyond ego requires making sacrifices for the greater good.

Actionable Steps: Decision-Making with Humility

(1) Daily Self-Reflection: Take time for self-reflection to identify potential ego-driven thoughts and behaviors.

(2) Create a Culture of Openness: Encourage feedback from your team and be receptive to constructive criticism.

(3) Step into Others’ Shoes: Empathize with different perspectives to gain a deeper understanding of the impact of your decisions.

(4) Consult Trusted Advisors: Seek advice from mentors or trusted colleagues to gain objective insights.

(5) Practice Servant Leadership: Put the needs of your team and organization before your own.

Leading with Humility and Clarity

Leadership beyond ego is a journey of continuous growth and improvement. Let’s commit to self-awareness, embrace humility, and make decisions that elevate our organizations to new heights.

 

 

About the Author: Howard M. Shore is the CEO of Activate Group, Inc., a renowned leadership development and executive coaching firm. With 20 years of experience guiding organizations to achieve their full potential, Howard empowers leaders to overcome challenges and achieve transformative results. He is passionate about helping executives navigate complex decisions, build high-performing teams, and create thriving workplace cultures. Howard M. Shore continues to inspire leaders worldwide through his unique insights and proven strategies.

Empowering Your Team’s Input: The Key to Inclusive Decision-Making

As leaders, we are often responsible for making critical decisions that impact our organizations’ future. While it’s tempting to rely solely on our own expertise, there’s immense value in embracing inclusive decision-making. In this article, we’ll explore the transformative power of incorporating diverse perspectives and empowering your team’s input in decision-making.

The Strength in Diversity: Embracing Different Perspectives

As a C-Suite leader, you’ve assembled a team of talented individuals with unique backgrounds, experiences, and expertise. Leveraging this diversity can be a game-changer. When you invite your team to contribute to decision-making, you tap into a wealth of knowledge and creativity that can lead to innovative solutions and better outcomes.

Fostering a Culture of Openness: Encouraging Input

Creating an environment where team members feel comfortable sharing their ideas is crucial. Encourage open discussions and actively seek input from all levels of the organization. Emphasize that each voice matters and their contributions are essential to the decision-making process.

Building Consensus: Aligning Towards a Common Goal

Inclusive decision-making doesn’t mean making decisions by committee. Instead, it’s about finding common ground and aligning toward a shared vision. When diverse perspectives come together and reach a consensus, it strengthens the team’s commitment to executing the decision effectively.

Transparency and Communication: The Cornerstones of Success

Transparency is the foundation of inclusive decision-making. Communicate the decision-making process clearly to your team, outline the factors considered, and explain how their input influenced the final decision. Transparent communication fosters trust and shows your team that their opinions are valued.

Actionable Steps: Empowering Your Team’s Input

(1)  Cultivate an Inclusive Culture: Create an environment that celebrates diversity and encourages open dialogue.

(2)  Active Listening: Listen actively to your team’s input, ensuring they feel heard and valued.

(3)  Diverse Decision-Making Forums: Establish various channels for input, such as team meetings, suggestion boxes, or online forums.

(4)  Training and Development: Invest in training to enhance communication skills and problem-solving capabilities.

(5)  Recognition and Appreciation: Recognize and appreciate team members whose ideas contributed to successful decisions.

Unleashing the Power of Inclusive Decision-Making

Inclusive decision-making unleashes the true potential of your organization. As leaders, let’s empower our teams, embrace diversity, and harness collective wisdom to lead our organizations toward sustainable success.

 

About the Author: Howard M. Shore is the CEO of Activate Group, Inc., a renowned leadership development and executive coaching firm. With 20 years of experience guiding organizations to achieve their full potential, Howard empowers leaders to overcome challenges and achieve transformative results. He is passionate about helping executives navigate complex decisions, build high-performing teams, and create thriving workplace cultures. Howard continues to inspire leaders worldwide through his unique insights and proven strategies.

Leadership vs. Management: The Symphony of Organizational Success

In the vast business world, two distinct roles often stand head and shoulders above the rest, guiding the fate of organizations: leadership and management. While they intertwine, their differences are what make businesses thrive. Let’s break down these roles and amplify our understanding with a story from the corporate trenches.

The Spark and The Blueprint: A Real-life Account

Imagine a bustling tech firm. At its helm was James, a charismatic leader, constantly illuminating paths to groundbreaking innovations. His team revered him for his vision, but there was a palpable disconnect: those visions weren’t translating into actionable outcomes.

This changed when Maya joined the ranks. Her meticulous planning and execution-focused mindset became the blueprint for James’ spark. Together, they showcased the dynamism of leadership and management. With his ability to inspire and see the unseen, James was balanced by Maya’s knack for transforming vision into actionable steps.

Leadership: The Beacon

Leadership is the heart and soul of an organization. It’s the ability to envision what’s beyond the horizon, inspire, and kindle passion. Leaders are the beacons, shining light on new directions and possibilities. They answer the question of WHY, driving motivation, and setting the bigger picture.

However, a beacon alone can’t set the course; it requires a map and a strategy.

Management: The Navigator

Management is the brain behind operations. It’s grounded in the present, anchored in the HOW. Managers create strategies, allocate resources, and ensure daily tasks align with overarching objectives. They are the navigators, taking the light from the beacon and plotting the best course forward.

Without navigation, even the brightest beacon can lead a ship astray.

Taking Action:

(1) Introspect: Understand where you naturally lean. Are you the beacon or the navigator? Recognizing this can help you strengthen your role and collaborate better.

(2) Collaborate: Pair visionaries with executors. This balance is vital to ensure that inspiration translates to action.

(3) Educate & Grow: The world of business is dynamic. Embrace continuous learning to refine both leadership and managerial skills.

Wrapping Up:

In the grand orchestra of business, leadership, and management are the two hands that play the piano, each vital, each unique. One sets the tone and the other ensures harmony. When businesses understand and respect these roles, they create a symphony of success.

Reflect on your organization. Are you championing both vision and execution? Harness the power of leadership and management; and let your business sing.

 

 

About the Author: Howard M. Shore is the CEO of Activate Group, Inc. His decades-long journey in business has seen him help organizations, guiding them from challenges to milestones. Howard’s expertise in both leadership and management has been a transformative force for countless businesses.

Leading Through Disagreement: Navigating Tough Decisions with Grace

This article provides practical strategies for C-Suite leaders to handle disagreements, promote inclusive decision-making, and build a more cohesive and resilient organization. It emphasizes the importance of empathy, teamwork, and constructive feedback to lead gracefully and achieve organizational success.

As a C-Suite leader, you’ve undoubtedly faced situations where decisions were made that you disagreed with. It’s never easy to find yourself at odds with the choices being made within your organization, but how you handle these moments can define your leadership prowess. In this article, we’ll explore strategies to help you move forward and turn disagreement into an opportunity for growth and collaboration.

The Power of Perspective: Understanding the Why

When faced with decisions that don’t align with your vision, it’s crucial to take a step back and understand their rationale. Seek open and honest conversations with decision-makers, allowing them to share their perspectives. Remember, diverse viewpoints can lead to better outcomes, and appreciating different angles is essential for a healthy organizational culture.

For example, at one point in my leadership journey, I found myself at odds with a significant strategic decision to invest in a new market. Initially, I was skeptical about the move and felt it might divert resources from our core strengths. However, after engaging in candid discussions with the executive team and understanding their vision, I realized the untapped potential and strategic opportunities that the new market offered. Embracing their perspective, we collectively transformed the decision into a successful venture that strengthened our organization.

Fostering Constructive Dialogue: Communication Is Key

In instances where you didn’t feel properly included in the decision-making process, don’t let resentment fester. Initiate discussions with the relevant parties to express your feelings and concerns. Share your insights, and don’t be afraid to respectfully challenge the status quo. By encouraging open communication, you foster an environment of transparency and collaboration, which can help avoid similar situations in the future.

For instance, during a time of organizational restructuring, I noticed that the executive team had made decisions without consulting key stakeholders from different departments. Recognizing the potential for misalignment, I organized a meeting where all departments had the chance to share their perspectives on the changes. The dialogue allowed us to address concerns and integrate valuable insights into the implementation plan, leading to a smoother transition and improved teamwork.

Teamwork Makes the Dream Work: Enhancing Collaboration

In an organization, unity is strength. Big decisions require a cohesive executive team that works together seamlessly. If your team lacks teamwork and struggles to implement decisions properly, it’s time for intervention. Consider team-building exercises, leadership workshops, or hiring an external facilitator to address underlying issues and build a strong, synchronized team.

One example from our own organization involved a challenging decision to restructure our departments. The lack of teamwork among the executive team caused confusion and resistance among employees. To rectify the situation, we invested in leadership development and team-building activities that fostered trust and collaboration. As a result, we saw a significant improvement in how decisions were made and executed.

Leading with Empathy: Avoiding Collateral Damage

When organizational decisions cause turmoil, leaders must empathize with their team’s concerns. Acknowledge the challenges and offer support to those affected. Be transparent about the steps being taken to mitigate any adverse effects. Demonstrating empathy will strengthen trust and loyalty within your organization.

I recall a time when a decision to downsize certain departments led to layoffs. The affected employees understandably felt upset and disheartened. As a leader, I made sure to communicate the decision with compassion, provide assistance with job placements, and offer support in their transition. Acknowledging their feelings and being sensitive to their needs fostered a culture of care and unity, even during difficult times.

Complaints vs. Constructive Input: Striking the Right Balance

Feeling exposed or disrespected by a decision can be demoralizing. However, before raising complaints, evaluate your intentions. Instead of simply venting frustration, focus on providing constructive input. Highlight potential pitfalls, suggest alternatives, and collaborate with your superiors to find viable solutions. Constructive feedback shows your commitment to the company’s success and enhances your standing as a valued team member.

For instance, when I found myself feeling left out of a critical decision-making process, I paused and assessed my emotions. Instead of complaining, I sought a meeting with the executives to express my concerns constructively. By presenting alternative approaches and aligning the decision with our organization’s long-term goals, I demonstrated my commitment to our shared success, leading to more inclusive decision-making in the future.

Actionable Steps: Turning Disagreement into Progress

(1) Reflect and Regroup: Take time to process your emotions and gain clarity about your concerns before engaging in discussions.

(2) Seek Dialogue: Initiate conversations with decision-makers to understand the reasoning behind their choices and share your perspectives.

(3) Promote Teamwork: Invest in team-building activities to foster a strong, united executive team.

(4) Demonstrate Empathy: Support and assist those affected by the decisions, displaying genuine care for your team’s well-being.

(5) Constructive Feedback: Present alternative solutions and insights when expressing disagreement, highlighting your commitment to the organization’s success.

Call to Action: Embrace Disagreement as an Opportunity

Great leaders embrace moments of dissent as opportunities for growth and innovation. By understanding different perspectives, fostering communication, and prioritizing teamwork and empathy, we can turn disagreements into stepping stones toward a more successful and united organization. Remember, it’s in these moments that we truly define our leadership capabilities.

 

 

About the Author – Howard M. Shore is the CEO of Activate Group, Inc., a successful leadership development and executive coaching firm. With 20 years of experience guiding organizations to achieve their full potential, Howard empowers leaders to overcome challenges and achieve transformative results. He is passionate about helping executives navigate complex decisions, build high-performing teams, and create thriving workplace cultures. Howard M. Shore continues to inspire leaders through his unique insights and proven strategies.

Steering the Ship: Navigating Organizational Changes with Teamwork and Clarity

Today, we’re diving into the world of organizational structure decisions and the challenges they bring. When executive teams fail to work in harmony and proper communication is lacking, the organization can face unnecessary collateral damage. As leaders, it’s our responsibility to steer the ship and guide our teams through these turbulent waters. This article explores strategies to avoid pitfalls and help everyone move forward productively.

A Clear Vision: The Foundation of Successful Decisions

Any significant organizational change requires a clear and compelling vision. As leaders, we must communicate this vision effectively to our teams, ensuring everyone is aligned and understands the purpose behind the decisions. When the vision is embraced by all, it becomes the guiding light through the transformation process.

Unifying the Executive Team: Embracing Collective Responsibility

The executive team plays a pivotal role in implementing changes. It’s crucial to foster a culture of collective responsibility where all members work together towards common objectives. Encourage regular meetings to discuss progress, challenges, and celebrate achievements. Strong teamwork among executives sets the tone for collaboration throughout the organization.

Transparent Communication: The Bridge to Success

One of the biggest reasons organizational changes fail is due to poor communication. Open and honest communication is essential during these times. Share updates, be transparent about the reasons for the changes, and actively listen to employees’ concerns. Embrace feedback and address it constructively, creating an environment of trust and respect.

Mitigating the Impact: Prioritizing Employee Support

Big decisions can create uncertainty and stress among employees. As leaders, we must prioritize supporting our teams through these transitions. Offer training and resources to equip them for the changes ahead. Acknowledge the challenges they might face and provide a safe space for them to share their apprehensions. Be accessible and approachable to address their needs.

The Art of Accountability: Learning from Mistakes

Organizational changes may not always go as planned, but that doesn’t mean failure is the end result. Leaders must take accountability for missteps, learn from them, and adapt the approach accordingly. Use these experiences as valuable lessons to refine the decision-making process and strengthen the organization’s resilience.

Complaining vs. Constructive Problem-Solving: Channeling Discontent

During times of significant change, emotions can run high, and complaints may arise. However, leaders must differentiate between mindless griping and constructive problem-solving. Encourage employees to share their concerns with a focus on finding solutions. This approach cultivates a culture of innovation and continuous improvement.

Actionable Steps: Guiding Your Organization Through Change

(1) Craft a Compelling Vision: Develop a clear and inspiring vision for the organizational changes and ensure everyone understands and embraces it.

(2) Strengthen Executive Teamwork: Foster a culture of collective responsibility among the executive team to lead the way through the transformation.

(3) Transparent Communication: Keep employees informed through open, transparent communication, and actively listen to their feedback.

(4) Supporting Employees: Prioritize employee well-being by providing necessary training, resources, and a safe space for sharing concerns.

(5) Learn and Adapt: Take accountability for mistakes, learn from them, and adapt your approach to improve future decisions.

Call to Action: Leading with Grace and Resilience

As leaders, we have the power to steer our organizations through tumultuous times with grace and resilience. Let’s embrace transparency, foster teamwork, and prioritize employee support as we navigate the path to success.

 

About the Author: Howard M. Shore is the CEO of Activate Group, Inc., a renowned leadership development and executive coaching firm. With 20 years of experience guiding organizations to achieve their full potential, Howard empowers leaders to overcome challenges and achieve transformative results. He is passionate about helping executives navigate complex decisions, build high-performing teams, and create thriving workplace cultures. Howard consistently inspires leaders through his unique insights and proven strategies.

Why Your Business Should Be Prioritizing its Employee Retention Efforts

“Every employee is a cog in your business machine, and losing one can bring the whole system to a grinding halt.”

Allow me to introduce you to Middling Tech Inc., a mid-sized tech company on the brink of disaster due to high employee turnover. Amidst constant project delays and plummeting customer satisfaction, Middling Tech grappled with an impending meltdown.

The management mistakenly thought that all their employees cared about was money. They believed that generous salaries would keep their team loyal. But as I underscored in my book “The Leader Launchpad,” understanding that employees are not solely driven by money but seek to feel valued, involved, and yearning for growth is key to retention.

The Gallup study, in fact, highlighted that a staggering 75% of the reasons for employee turnover are directly under the control of management. Poor management practices like lack of recognition, insufficient development opportunities, and closed lines of communication made up the lion’s share of reasons for employee dissatisfaction.

So, how can you, like Middling Tech, turn the tide on employee turnover and transform it into a win for your business? Here are four concrete, actionable steps to prioritize retention:

Reevaluate Your Hiring Process

Don’t just focus on skill; instead, emphasize on cultural fit. A sense of belonging and alignment with company values significantly contributes to employee retention.

Encourage Open Communication

Foster a culture where employees feel comfortable expressing their ideas and concerns. Regular check-ins or ‘one-on-ones’ can provide a platform for this exchange and can act as an early warning system for employee dissatisfaction.

Recognize and Reward

A simple ‘thank you’ or a shout-out in a team meeting can go a long way. Rewards don’t always have to be monetary; recognition and gratitude can be powerful motivators and help employees feel valued.

Promote Development and Learning

Offer opportunities for career growth and continuous learning. This could be through in-house training, webinars, online courses, or mentorship programs.

By implementing these strategies, Middling Tech managed to navigate its way out of the retention crisis. Their journey wasn’t short, but the long-term benefits were well worth the effort, leading to decreased employee turnover, increased productivity, and improved customer satisfaction.

In “Your Business is a Leaky Bucket,” I wrote, “Every interaction, every project, every meeting is a chance to inspire and appreciate your employees.” If your business is struggling with high employee turnover, consider how you can transform each interaction into an opportunity for recognition, appreciation, and growth.

To conclude, it’s clear that prioritizing employee retention isn’t optional – it’s a business necessity. The respect you show your employees, the value you place on their contributions, and the investment you make in their growth can drive your business to new heights.

Your employees are your greatest asset – treat them well, and they will treat your business well.

 

About the Author: Howard M. Shore is the CEO of Activate Group Inc., an organization committed to helping businesses unlock their potential. As an acclaimed author of “The Leader Launchpad” and “Your Business is a Leaky Bucket,” his mission is to inspire leaders to turn their vision into reality by engaging their teams, developing deep business acumen, and unlocking the hidden potential within their organizations.

Sources:

  1. Gallup, State of the American Workplace Report, 2017.
  2. Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM), Human Capital Benchmarking Report, 2016.

 

How to Incorporate Accountability into Your Workplace Culture

Accountability is the backbone of any successful business. As a business leader and author, I’ve seen firsthand how fostering a culture of accountability can catapult a company’s performance and results. This article will explore what accountability means in a business, why it matters, and five proven techniques to infuse accountability into your workplace culture.

What Does Accountability Mean in a Business?

In business, accountability isn’t merely about pointing fingers when something goes wrong. It’s about nurturing a sense of ownership, where every team member takes responsibility for their actions and the outcomes they produce.

A culture of accountability fosters transparency, trust, and an environment conducive to growth and innovation. It empowers employees to work with a sense of purpose and commitment, directly impacting the company’s bottom line.

The Impact of a Lack of Accountability: Why It Matters

Neglecting accountability can lead to detrimental effects, such as time waste, inconsistent performance, and diminished team morale. It’s like sailing a ship with a hole in the hull; no matter how well you navigate, you’re bound to sink eventually, as I explained in my book “Your Business is a Leaky Bucket.”

However, when accountability is ingrained into the workplace culture, it paves the way for improved efficiency, consistent performance, and a higher level of engagement from the team.

How to Develop Accountability: 5 Techniques

Now, let’s delve into how to instill this vital trait into your workplace culture.

(1)  Lead by Example:  The best way to encourage accountability is by exemplifying it. Leaders must walk the talk. Admit mistakes when they occur, take responsibility for team outcomes, and show how you strive for improvements.

(2)  Develop Two-Way Feedback Skills:  A culture of accountability thrives on open communication. Cultivate a feedback-rich environment where team members can freely share constructive feedback, voice concerns, and present ideas.

(3)  Goal Setting:  Goals provide a clear path and end-point for employees to strive towards. Each team member should have a well-defined role with specific, measurable goals that align with the company’s broader objectives.

(4)  Develop Trust and Empower:  Trust your team to take on responsibilities and let them make decisions within their realm. This empowerment fosters a sense of ownership and drives accountability.

(5)  Recognize and Reward:  Acknowledge team members who consistently demonstrate accountability. This recognition sends a clear message about the behaviors and values your organization applauds.

Building accountability into your workplace culture doesn’t happen overnight. It requires consistent effort, clear communication, and above all, a steadfast commitment from leadership. Remember, as I stated in “The Leader Launchpad,” “Your people are your business. Treat them well, and they will treat your customers well.”

 

About the Author:  Howard M. Shore is the CEO of Activate Group, Inc., an expert in business strategy and performance improvement, and a sought-after speaker. He is the author of “The Leader Launchpad” and “Your Business is a Leaky Bucket,” sharing his extensive knowledge and experience in leadership, team development, and operational efficiency.

The High Cost of Poor Leadership: An Unseen Tax on Your Business

Imagine a company, let’s call it XYZ Inc., with the potential to skyrocket. They possess innovative products, robust financial backing, and a promising market. However, despite these assets, XYZ’s growth graph remains stubbornly flat. Employee morale is low, turnover rates are high, and productivity is waning. The culprit? Poor leadership.

Studies have shown that poor leadership can cost companies enormously financially and in their corporate culture. According to Topgrading guru Brad Smart, hiring the wrong leader can cost anywhere between 10 and 25 times the compensation. Moreover, Gallup found that 70% of the variation in employee engagement is attributable to managers.

What this tells us is clear: The price we pay for poor leadership is too high.

Identifying the Price of Poor Leadership

Poor leadership results in a deteriorating corporate culture. Employees lose faith in their organization, feeling undervalued and disengaged. This disengagement manifests in absenteeism, high turnover rates, and underperformance, creating a vicious cycle that saps a company’s vitality.

These issues were quite apparent in XYZ Inc. The symptoms were clear, but they struggled to diagnose the root cause. An unhealthy focus on short-term goals and neglect of employee development created a culture of disillusionment and detachment. This drove their most talented employees away, while those who remained were disengaged and underproductive. XYZ Inc. was, in effect, hemorrhaging potential.

Evaluating Leadership Effectiveness

So, how can we recognize poor leadership and, more importantly, measure leadership effectiveness? It comes down to three factors: employee engagement, productivity, and business growth. Engaged employees are more productive, and productivity drives growth. It’s a simple formula that can quickly become complicated by poor leadership.

Leadership is a tricky metric to measure. However, a good starting point could be regular employee feedback and monitoring productivity and employee turnover rates. In the words from my book, “The Leader Launchpad,” “What gets measured gets done. What gets measured and fed back gets done well. What gets rewarded gets repeated.”

Turning Things Around: Strategies to Improve Leadership Approach

After identifying the root of their problems, XYZ Inc. decided to turn things around. They embraced strategies that encouraged better leadership and cultivated a healthier corporate culture.

Firstly, they addressed the leadership issue by investing in comprehensive leadership training programs. They recognized the need for leaders who could inspire, motivate, and engage their teams rather than merely manage them.

Secondly, they began identifying emerging leaders within their organization. These individuals showed initiative, adaptability, and strong communication skills – all hallmarks of good leadership. These emerging leaders were nurtured, given further development opportunities, and gradually transitioned into leadership roles.

Additionally, XYZ Inc. shifted its focus from short-term wins to long-term growth. They understood the value of employee development and started investing in their people, which improved engagement and reduced turnover.

Turning Potential into Performance

Over time, the results of these interventions became clear. Employee engagement surged, productivity increased, and turnover rates decreased dramatically. Most importantly, XYZ Inc.’s growth graph finally started to climb. It’s not an overnight process, but any company can replicate this success with consistent effort and focus.

The case of XYZ Inc. illustrates the cost of poor leadership and the power of effective leadership to drive growth. In my book, “Your Business is a Leaky Bucket,” I wrote, “Just because you’re in the driver’s seat, doesn’t mean you know the direction you’re going or how to get there.” Leadership is the compass that provides direction and a destination for your business. Poor leadership will lead you astray, while effective leadership will guide you toward success.

 

About the Author: Howard M. Shore is the CEO of Activate Group, Inc., a leadership coaching company, and the author of “The Leader Launchpad” and “Your Business is a Leaky Bucket.” With decades of leadership experience, Howard has helped countless companies turn potential into performance. His work aims to help businesses optimize their operations and leadership, ultimately leading to improved productivity and growth.

5 Ways to Increase Employee Satisfaction

I’m working with many companies as a leadership development coach and have noticed that many of them lack good strategy in one key area: employee satisfaction. At Activate Group Inc., we use a system called Human Capital Management to effectively manage employees, and ensure long-term growth and satisfaction of “A” players. This process starts with hiring the right people and ends with maintaining employee satisfaction. As you probably know by now, it costs so much more to replace a great employee than to simply keep them happy.

How to Keep Employees Happy

Here are five ways to ensure your best employees stay happy, stay productive, and stay with you for a long time:

1. Hire Right.

The best way to ensure long-term employee satisfaction and success is to hire the right person for the right job in the first place. Too many companies hire “blindly” by simply scanning resumes, getting a few recommendations and hiring quickly. Using assessment tools to screen for people with the right skill sets for open positions (before you even look at resumes) is one of the easiest methods to increase the number of candidates that are a good match for the job and the company.

2. Regular Affirmations.

Show your people appreciation by saying it regularly. Recognize when someone goes above and beyond, even if it is something small. Thank them when they coach others. Here is a fantastic list of motivating phrases from the Bud to Boss blog.

3. Onboarding Plan.

When you bring a new employee onboard, you need to do it the right way. A detailed plan for the first 90 days for every new employee is a crucial tool in getting them off to a positive start with the company. Many employees who have a negative onboarding experience (no training, no expectations, no coaching, etc) end up leaving the company — and that costs you money.

4. Employee Recognition Program.

Every company should have an employee recognition program, even small companies and even if it’s just a simple program. Recognizing and rewarding employees for going above and beyond the call of duty is super-charged positive reinforcement, and is also highly contagious. A word of caution: avoid rewarding employees for simply doing their job. After all, they are being compensated for doing their jobs and achieving certain milestones. Rewards work best when they are reserved for special effort.

5. Job Satisfaction Survey.

Once a year (or every couple years) you should ask employees to fill out a simple survey about their experiences with the company. Keep it confidential and keep it relatively short — try for 20 questions or less. Ask them about their career development, relationship with their manager, team environment, and if they feel like they are contributing to the company goals. All of these things are essential to job satisfaction.

How to Keep Employees Motivated

How high is your employee satisfaction? Do you know or are you guessing? Here are a few more tips on how to motivate employees from one of my earlier articles.

Howard Shore is a leadership development coach who works with companies that need executive development and strategic business coaching. Based out of Miami, Florida, Howard’s firm, Activate Group Inc., provides management coaching to businesses across the country. To learn more about leadership development coaching through AGI, please contact us at 305.722.7213 or email Howard today.

The Difference Between Training and Development

How much budget have you wasted on training that didn’t result in ROI? I’m a sales trainer and business coach that sees failed training and development programs every day. If you are spending your training dollars on training that strengthens employees’ skills while allowing them to grow personally and professionally — then you are in the very successful minority.

Training vs. Development

There is a big difference between training and development. If you (and your HR team) don’t know the difference between these terms, you are spending money providing training to executives and managers who already have the skills and knowledge they need. This training will not move the needle for your company. What you need is to develop existing skills to their maximum potential.

Training = Teaching New Skills

Development = Perfecting Existing Skills

You have likely invested a lot in recruitment so you could find and hire the best possible candidates, right? They have the knowledge and skills, but that doesn’t necessarily mean they will be successful in your company. How many times have you met individuals with Ivy League degrees whose careers went nowhere?

The Importance of Training and Development

The foundation of running and building a company lies in the overall performance of the team. Your success depends on your ability to identify, recruit, hire, develop and retain the absolute best talent you can afford to achieve the highest level of performance. I have written quite a few articles on the issues related to identifying, recruiting and hiring the right talent. While that is a big struggle for many companies, there is a real issue related to developing and retaining good talent.

As a business coach, I have had an opportunity to visit with hundreds of CEOs and peek under the hood of many of their companies. From what I have seen, even from some of the companies that have good revenue and profit growth, there is a lot of lip service paid to staff being important, being a real asset to the business and the key to their success, but their actions and treatment of these so called “assets” is inconsistent with their words.

If CEOs really meant what they said about talent, there would be a lot more emphasis on employee development. It would start first with hiring stronger people to run the Human Resource function (or outsourcing in smaller companies) to bring a more strategic view to developing the organization’s talent. Many executives think that if they hire the right people then they do not need to worry about development, and this could not be further from the truth.

Defining the Difference Between Training vs. Development

I first want to clarify the difference between training and development. Oftentimes these two terms are used interchangeably. There is an important distinction, and many times leadership uses training improperly, causing them to misuse company resources for the sake of saying they provide training and development.

Training

Training is the process for transferring knowledge, experience, or new skills to a person or group that does not currently possess them. Training is the acquisition of knowledge, skills and competencies as a result of teaching.

Development

Development is a more holistic process of helping an individual to achieve peak potential. Development teaches people how to become more productive and effective at work and at the company. In other words, training provides the skill and development maximizes it. Training is a component of development and only part of the equation.

When you focus on developing your employees, you are helping them use their existing skills and your company resources to perform better. The best development programs give employees the opportunity to discover things that they would have never discovered in their day-to-day work. As you strengthen individuals, the team as a whole also becomes stronger. As the team gets stronger, the organization becomes more successful.

Components of Employee Development

Organizations that take employee development seriously have a complete talent management system. In addition to training, the following are components you should consider in your employee development program:

1. Position Profile 

The position profile helps the employee see how their role fits in the context of the organization and communicates the link between business strategy and internal processes. It is a detailed piece of information that provides the required competencies and skills to execute the position successfully, and the position’s performance accountability and performance management aspects. By comparing the needs of the position with your employees and candidates for the position, you can see gaps and, when necessary, provide training to fill the gaps.

2. Key Performance Indicators 

By establishing key performance indicators, measuring performance and communicating those performance results, you help your employees understand how they are doing in your organization. When gaps in performance are occurring, it points to developmental needs for that individual.

3. Performance Reviews 

We recommend performance feedback on at least an annual basis.

4. Developmental Program 

During this annual process, the supervisor and employees work together to identify steps to help that individual to improve their skills and approach to their current positions as well as help them prepare for growth for greater opportunities. This is a proactive approach to identifying reading materials, seminars, workshops, webinars, and other ways to assist the employees to propel their careers.

5. Mentor Programs 

A mentor is someone that shows you the way. They have been there before, so they show you how they have done it. Their qualification is the outcomes they have achieved. They are typically donating their time and not getting compensated for the advice they bring.

6. Executive Coaching 

The executive coach’s role is to help an individual unlock their potential and is not about teaching or showing the way. The coach helps the person being coached discover areas where their motives, values, and personality traits are causing them to be less effective as a leader. The biggest part of coaching is to help the person being coached become self-aware, as research has shown that the higher the position a person holds within an organization, the higher the gap in self-awareness.

Your people truly are the most important asset in your organization. They were hired for their skills and knowledge, and it is time to think about developing their skills to their maximum potential to propel your organization’s growth.

Howard Shore is a leadership development, executive coach and business coach who works with companies that need leadership development and strategic business coaching. Based in Miami, Florida and Dallas, Texas, Howard’s firm, Activate Group, Inc. provides leadership coaching to businesses across the country. To learn more about leadership development coaching through AGI, please contact us today or give us a call at 305.722.7213.

5 Signs You Need a Leadership Coach

Of the many hats I wear at AGI, I think my favorite is that of leadership development coach. The experience of working one-on-one with business leaders and helping them become the best leaders they can be is very rewarding. Once in a while, I encounter people who don’t know if they are at the right point in their careers to benefit from leadership coaching.

Here are five easy-to-recognize signs that you are a leader who would benefit from a professional coach:

1. You frequently wish you had mentor. If you regularly have issues you wish you could bounce off an experienced executive, a leadership coach can help. Having an experienced advisor can help you gain reassurance that your decisions are thorough and can be an enormous benefit to you, your employees and the company. We coaches are also unbiased so we can offer sound, rational advice.

2. You want a strategic collaborator. If you need guidance from someone that can help you develop or review strategies, you are ready to hire a leadership coach. We’ve been a part of creating hundreds of successful business strategies, in boom years and downturns. When it comes to crafting the right strategic plan, we are incredible resources to draw from.

4. You need a confidential advisor. Like a consillere to the Godfather, a leadership coach can be your personal and private advisor. We all have moments when personal issues make us vulnerable and times when we need to discuss sensitive business issues. At those times, a leadership development coach can talk through things and keep the discussions “in the vault”.

5. You want access to the best tools and practices. Leadership development coaches have access to strategic tools that have been proven to increase company and people performance. When you engage with a coach, you automatically get access to those tools without the commitment of long-term contracts.

Think you might be ready for a leadership development coach? I’d love to hear from you!

Howard Shore is a leadership development coach who works with companies that need leadership development and strategic business coaching. Based in Miami, Florida, Howard’s firm, Activate Group, Inc. provides leadership and management coaching to businesses across the country. To learn more about leadership development coaching through AGI, please contact Howard at 305.722.7213 or email him.